Thursday, March 13, 2014

Bring Back Prayer and Thoughts on The National Anthem

You know how some things touch you even though you don't remember where you read, saw, or heard it?  Sometimes you might even misquote someone as having said something because you don't recall who actually said it.  I've done it!  In this case, I guess we're not really trying to misquote or give someone else credit, it is the message that we are trying to get across.

I think that is what has happened with this editorial that was forwarded by a reader.  Don't get me wrong, I really do appreciate the emails and stories and this particular reader didn't actually give someone else credit, I think the message was simply forwarded onto me.  Thank you for thinking of me.

The message is powerful and I believe reflects the feelings of many Christians around the world.  Let me stop there for a second, if I may.  I say Christians, but wouldn't any person feel strongly about their faith and want to stand up?  Stand up and have the freedom to pray.

The following email has been circulating since about 2000 and attributes Paul Harvey or Andy Rooney as the author.  According to Snopes, the actual author is Nick Gholson, who writes for the TimesRecordNews in Wichita Falls, TX.  In addition, not all of the editorial below was in the original message but still seems prevalent.
ck Gholson, a sports writer for the Times Record News in Wichita Falls, Texas. Gholson's September 1999 essay (which was a fair bit longer than the version later circulated via e-mail) decried the prohibition against school-led prayer at high school football games.
Read more at http://www.snopes.com/politics/soapbox/prayer.asp#5ipe1DlhsSy1EItz.99
Nick Gholson, a sports writer for the Times Record News in Wichita Falls, Texas. Gholson's September 1999 essay (which was a fair bit longer than the version later circulated via e-mail) decried the prohibition against school-led prayer at high school football games.
Read more at http://www.snopes.com/politics/soapbox/prayer.asp#5ipe1DlhsSy1EItz.99
Nick Gholson, a sports writer for the Times Record News in Wichita Falls, Texas. Gholson's September 1999 essay (which was a fair bit longer than the version later circulated via e-mail) decried the prohibition against school-led prayer at high school football games.
Read more at http://www.snopes.com/politics/soapbox/prayer.asp#5ipe1DlhsSy1EItz.99



I don't believe in Santa Claus, but I'm not going to sue somebody for singing a Ho-Ho-Ho song in December.
 

I don't agree with Darwin, but I didn't go out and hire a lawyer when my high school teacher taught his theory of evolution.

Life, liberty or your pursuit of happiness will not be endangered in any way because someone says a 30-second prayer before a football game.

So what's the big deal?

It's not like somebody is up there reading the entire Book of Acts.  They're just talking to a God they believe in and asking him to grant safety to the players on the field and the fans going home from the game.

But it's a Christian prayer, some will argue.

Yes, and this is the United States of America, and Canada, countries founded on Christian principles.  According to our very own phone book, Christian churches outnumber all others better than 200-to-1.
 

So what would you expect -- Somebody chanting Hare Krishna?

If I went to a football game in Jerusalem, I would expect to hear a Jewish prayer.

If I went to a soccer game in Baghdad, I would expect to hear a Muslim prayer.

If I went to a ping pong match in China, I would expect to hear someone pray to Buddha.

And I wouldn't be offended. It wouldn't bother me one bit.

When in Rome .....

But what about the atheists?  Is another argument.

What about them?

Nobody is asking them to be baptized.  We're not going to pass the collection plate. Just humor us for 30 seconds.  If that's asking too much, bring a Walkman or a pair of ear plugs. Go to the bathroom.  Visit the concession stand.  Call your lawyer!  Or, just exercise their right to leave this country!

Unfortunately, one or two will call their lawyer.  One or two will tell thousands what they can and cannot do.  I don't think a short prayer at a football game is going to shake the world's foundations.

Christians are just sick and tired of turning the other cheek while our courts strip us of all our rights.  Our parents and grandparents taught us to pray before eating, to pray before we go to sleep.  Our Bible tells us to pray without ceasing.  Now a handful of people and their lawyers are telling us to cease praying.

God, help us.  And if that last sentence offends you, well, just sue me.

The silent majority has been silent too long.  It's time we tell that one or two who scream loud enough to be heard that the vast majority doesn't care what they want!

It is time that the majority rules!

It's time we tell them, "You don't have to pray; you don't have to say the Pledge of Allegiance; you don't have to believe in God or attend services that honor Him.  That is your right, and we will honor your right; But by golly, You are no longer going to take our rights away.  We are fighting back, and we WILL WIN!"




Pretty powerful, huh?  Is there any way that we can each pray or meditate while together and not offend?  If I pray to my God, why can't someone else pray to theirs at the same time?  I think part of the problem is that a prayer to a Christian God is being publicly officiated while the other gods and deities are not acknowledged.  I mean, we do the National Anthem of each country represented during the Olympics.  Is that the not the same?
 
Please share your thoughts in the comments below.  Have you seen this message?  How does it make you feel?  What did/do you think?

 




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